Navigate / search

MONDAY TUNESDAY | 2 OCTOBER

Discover our favourite new jams this week. 

KIMBRA | EVERYBODY KNOWS

By Michelle He

The burbling synths open onto NZ legend Kimbra’s full blown comeback, starting with this corker, Everybody Knows. This (I write with a hint of sadness), bears no resemblance to the screamer of a second album she released an age back in 2014, The Golden Echo, but leans altogether in a different direction. More soul, more Janelle Monae, it looks like LA’s finally sunk its claws into the New Zealand via Melbourne pop wunderkind. The chorus is addictive, even if the lyrics are a familiar refrain with an endless list of songs sharing the same name, and it’s altogether easier listening than her ecstatic, hyper last album. Something’s a-changin’, but it sounds brilliant

 

MEZKO | STEADY ON

By Ayden Measham-Pywell

Dreamy vocals behind synth lines that could almost be described as droning, you’d be wrong to describe Steady On as being pop, despite how close the vocals delivered by Mezko come to the genre. The track isn’t exactly a happy, or feel good one per say, rather it is a case of a great sounding piece that is just good to listen to. It engages on a technical level. Filled with careful layering and a mash of sounds, it’s hard not to be impressed by the track. 

 

SWIM TEAM | POSITIVELY HOPELESS

By Ayden Measham-Pywell

Offering their half of a split 7″ with Lazertits, Swim Team deliver a dreamy, yet clearly home grown, delight in Positively Hopeless. The quirky riffs, coupled with relatable lyrics creates a weirdly inspiring track.  the idea of being positively hopeless is one that we all feel at time, and the relaxed way in which it’s discussed in the track is comforting to say the least. While the lyrics are great, credit must be given to the chirpy nature of the guitar work that offers up just enough energy to encourage a bit of movement with every listen. Overall, Positively Hopeless is the perfect kind of relaxed track. It never feels bland or distant, but is also far from overwhelming. 

 

DZ DEATHRAYS | BAD INFLUENCE 

By Ayden Measham-Pywell

It could be the first time that the release of new DZ Deathrays could be described as cruel, but at 88 seconds in length (including an introduction) Bad Influence feels like little more than a tease. Does it work? 100%, but the raging, scuzzy rock piece makes no attempt to sedate our anticipation for the next DZ extended release, but maybe it’s not even trying to. 

HONOURABLE MENTIONS

Semplesize